Remembrance Day

Today, we are going to take a moment to honor the men and women who have risked their lives to make ours better. Many died, many didn’t return to their loved ones the same person that they were before they left.

It is said over at Canadian War Museum that over 100,000 people died during the wars. That’s a lot. Many people lied about their age, so they could join the Military.

I’ve had family member’s that fought in both World Wars, they didn’t come home alive. Instead, they left behind devastated wives and the young kids, or their mothers and fathers. I love researching family members, just to try to get a glimpse into their life. You can find out some really cool things. I found out that my great-grandfather was a rebel – a real bad ass. Now I know why I was such a “trouble” maker when I was younger. And where my mother got it from too…. see it’s all the genes 😉

Did you know you can search Books of Remembrance? You will be able to see some information, but it will give you a link back to the page it’s found on, and will even let you request a copy. I’ve done that and I have mine framed.

Veterans Affairs Canada has information about John McCrae the poet behind the famous poem: In Flanders Fields, it is also the site that I copied the poem from. Please take a visit and learn more about John. Such an incredible story about him. One can not even  imagine the horrors he and the others went through, well the Veterans can- but you and I don’t know what it was like.

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch, be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

Take time to remember. Wear your poppy proudly. Stand tall.

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